Tyre sizes

Discussion in 'E46 M3 (2001-2006)' started by crag, Mar 22, 2010.

  1. 22 Mar 2010 at 2:57 PM #1
    crag

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    I have a set of 18 and 19s wheels

    On the tyre sizes is it ok to change a little ie

    standard = 225 35 19

    can i change for example to - 235 40 19

    Im thinking the profile could be 35/40 or 45 and still be ok

    But would the width of 235 be ok in replace of 235

    Not very clued up on tyres so any info would be great
     
  2. 22 Mar 2010 at 3:08 PM #2
    BRUNBERG

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    try using the search function in future mate, ive posted this before but should answer all your questions.

    Standard factory oem 18" wheels.
    Width 18x8" Front 18x9" Rear ( offset ET47 and ET26)
    Front 225/45/18
    Rear 255/40/18

    The correct tyre upsize for 18" wheel
    Front 245/40/18
    Rear 275/35/18

    Standard factory oem 19" wheels.
    Width 19x8 "Front 19x9.5" Rear ( offset ET41 and ET27)
    Front 225/40/19
    Rear 255/35/19

    The correct upsize for 19" wheel
    Front 245/35/19
    Rear 275/30/19

    Although many M3 owners prefer
    Front 235/35/19
    Rear 265/30/19
    As they feel the correct upsize would cause the car to tramline.

    Standard factory CSL wheels as CSL REPLICAS
    Front 235/35-19
    Rear 265/30-19


    Factory wheel alignment specifications

    Front (specified ranges): Camber -1° 20' to -0° 40', Caster 6° 55' to 7° 55', Toe 1mm to 2.4mm, Turning Angle Difference -2.03° to -1.03°
    Front (specified ranges): Cross Camber -0° 30' to 0° 30', Cross Caster -0° 30' to 0° 30', Total Toe 1.9mm to 4.9mm
    Rear (specified ranges): Camber -2° 00' to -1° 30', Toe 1.7mm to 3.0mm
    Rear (specified ranges): Total Toe 3.4mm to 5.9mm, Thrust Angle -0.07° to 0.07°
     
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  3. 22 Mar 2010 at 3:12 PM #3
    mattbmw62

    mattbmw62

    I'm just about to fit 235/35/19s to the front.

    Good info Bruno !!
     
    mattbmw62, Mar 22, 2010
  4. 22 Mar 2010 at 3:18 PM #4
    BRUNBERG

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    your welcome mate, heres a few few other useful tips that i and a few others put together for another forum:thumbsup:

    Popular Tyres & Tyre Ware [edi999]
    Thought this might be useful for you fellas......Given the age old debate of tyre X wears faster than tyre Y I have taken a look at the wear ratings of tyres we commonly stick on our cars.

    'Treadwear grades are an indication of a tire's relative wear rate. The higher the treadwear number is, the longer it should take for the tread to wear down.
    A control tire is assigned a grade of 100. Other tires are compared to the control tire. For example, a tire grade of 200 should wear twice as long as the control tire.'

    So higher the better as far as wear is concerned.

    The results.........Best to worst!

    Kumho KU31 - 320
    Falken FK452 - 300
    Vredestein Ultrac Sessanta - 280
    Toyo T1R - 280
    Continental Sport Contact 3 -280
    Hankook Ventus S1 EVO - 280
    Goodyear Eagle F1 Assymetrics - 240
    Avon ZZ1 - 240
    Michelin Pilot Sport 2 - 220
    Yokohama Advan Sport - 180
    Pirelli PZero Rosso - 160
    Bridgestone Potenza RE050A - 140
    Michelin Pilot Sport Cup - 80

    So it seems the Kumhos will last the longest. You can search the database here;

    http://www.safercar.gov/portal/site/...2fd17898RCR D

    SPACERS

    Ok this is quite tricky as the size of tyre you run on your car, in addition to suspension, be it just a spring upgrade or full coilover setup will determine what you can get away with. Many coupe owners run 10mm spacers all round although I would advise against eibach's as it has been proved that these spacers are not "fit for purpose" on our cars. Personally I think the coupe's best stance is with 12mm spacers at the rear and 15mm spacers on the front. The convertible E46 M3 sits lower naturally due to the extra weight at the rear of the car although with a standard lowereing spring kit such as the eibch prokit you can comfortably run 12mm spacers at the front and 10mm spacers at the rear of the car.
    My advice would be to get in touch with the company you choose to purchase your spacers from, and inform them of the exact wheels, tyre sizes and suspension settings of your partiicular vehicle and have them advise you. Dont forget that you will need extended wheel bolts!


    Not my work but a more indepth explanation to replacement bushes. This write up is for rogue but obviously applies to powerflex etc

    Say goodbye to rear end clunks! With the introduction of the Rogue Engineering Rear Shock Mounts, you have a high quality, rebuildable, easily serviceable rear shock mount.

    Fits the following vehicles:

    Rogue Engineering Rear Shock Mount Set includes:

    Two (2) Rogue Engineering 6061-T6 CNC, Anodized Rear Shock Mounts.
    Four (4) Shore A 65 Bushings (2 required per mount).
    Two (2) 303 Stainless Steel Bushing Spacers (to be used with standard 10mm rear shocks).
    Four (4) 303 Stainless Steel Washers (2 required per mount).
    Four (4) Yellow Zinc plated serrated lock nuts.
    Two (2) Shock Tower Reinforcement Assemblies (with 10.9 hardware welded).
    Two (2) factory gaskets (#3352 1128 734).

    Problems with Factory Mounts
    The factory BMW rear shock mounts are generally a little soft, to provide the most possible acoustically dampening in the vehicle. However, design precludes them from being stout enough to withstand the rigours of aftermarket suspension, or even badly damaged roads. A decent sized pothole can send a perfectly good factory rear shock mount to pop out, making it entirely useless necessitating replacement. Upgrading to E46 M3 rear mounts (a popular alternative) is not a guarantee that it doesn't happen again and again.

    Rogue Engineering Rear Shock Mount Features
    By producing a rear shock machined from 6061-T6 aluminum, we are able attain a more stable, and stiffer platform which to mount the top of the rear shock. However, rather than use race-only spherical bearings or even overly stiff urethane bushings, we specify Shore A 65 hardness rubber bushings (approximately 30% stiffer than the factory bushings) to allow for some level of street comfort. The orientation of the bushings makes it impossible for the bushings to "pop out" in the manner which the factory mounts fail. If required, the bushings are also replaceable, when the time comes to rebuild them.

    Another feature is the reinforcement assembly which secures the rear shock mount to the vehicle. By reinforcing the top of the shock tower in the vehicle, it protect against the rear shock from ripping out the sheet metal. The reinforcement has its hardware welded to it, allowing for the rear shock mount to become a bottom-mount design. This means that if the rear shocks need to be removed, it only requires removing the two nuts and the single bolt at the bottom of the shock. No need to completely disassemble the trunk area to gain access. If being used with a rear strut tower brace, the reinforcement assembly may be mounted from the bottom, so that the rear shock mount can be secured in the traditional manner.


    ROGUE BLUE OR BLACK RTAB's

    Rouge engineering Black uprated rear trailing arm bushes,

    Problems with Factory Mounts:
    The factory BMW RTABs (Rear Trailing Arm Bushings) are a very soft material to provide the quietest, most comfortable ride possible. Because of this, we have seen factory mounts require replacement in less than 50,000 miles and 3 years. On modified vehicles, expect them to require replacement sooner.

    Are your bushings already shot?
    A simple test to determine if the stock rear trailing arm bushings require replacement is driving the vehicle in a straight line. While in gear, under full acceleration, does the car pull to one side? Additionally, under full, firm application of the brakes, does the car pull again? If you answered yes to either one, the bushings probably require replacement.

    Rogue Engineering Performance RTABs
    The bushing material used in Rogue Engineering Performance RTABs are now available in two different compounds, specifically for your needs. Both compounds now incorporate a silicone impregnated, polyurethane compound. The biggest different being the hardness of the material.

    1. Blue Compound - This harder compound is designed for TRACK applications, where monoball components are not allowed. Less expensive than full Delrin bushings, these bushings are extremely stiff to provide the absolute maximum performance at the TRACK. Please note, because of hardness of this compound, these can transmit more noise, vibration, and harshness.

    2. Black Compound -This compound is formulated for STREET applications. Softer than the blue, TRACK compound, these are stiffer than stock factory OEM bushings, and designed to last much longer than stock. Since these are the great compromise between OEM and our TRACK bushing.
    RACE/TRACK

    Our RACE/TRACE application uses a race-quality, high-load spherical bearing in a CNC\'d machined aluminum housing. This part eliminates ALL deflection in the rear trailing arm.

    This hardness is important in this bushing especially in modified vehicles, since they will exert more force on the rear suspension during acceleration.

    The inner sleeve that supports the bushings is made from 6061-T6 aluminum, CNC\'d to exacting specifications for a perfect fit.
     
  5. 22 Mar 2010 at 3:18 PM #5
    BRUNBERG

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    BRAKES

    The brakes on the E46 M3 are probably it's biggest failing. This can be an expensive fix if you want to go down the route of a BBK (big brake kit). Obviously callipers with more pistons and larger discs will be the ultimate, and all of the big names in the "stopping" world have a package for our cars inc Brembo, AP Racing etc etc

    However a good lower cost option would be to run good brake fluid and a brake hose upgrade with either Pagid rs14's or PZF pads.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Brake fluid & Braided lines

    There is a lot of misinformation about which Brake Fluid is the best to use so thought i'd post this to clear a few things up!

    * The trouble comes when people start quoting DOT ratings with sweeping statements like a DOT 5 or DOT 5.1 fluid is better than a DOT 4 fluid, well I'm afraid you can't make statements like that because in most cases it isn't true, you get lots of opinions about whats the best brand so here is my opinion based on some facts!

    * Firstly to set a few things straight.

    * Castrol SRF is DOT 4 rated and is definitely not DOT 5.
    DOT 5 rating is reserved SOLELY for Silicone based brake fluids and these should not be used in performance applications. Basically any moisture entering the system will stay in small bubbles or pockets as water cannot be absorbed into silicone fluids. As soon as the fluid reaches around 100C (pressure dependent) the trapped water will boil. As gases can be compressed and fluids can't your brake pedal will become softer. Separated water in the system can also lead to corrosion on metal components (pistons etc.). Silicone fluids should not be mixed with other DOT rated fluids as they are completely different chemically.

    * DOT 3, DOT 4 and DOT 5.1 brake fluids are Glycol-ether based fluids. Glycol-ether is hygroscopic which means it absorbs water into the fluid (water combines with the fluid, water doesn't sit separately as with Silicone fluids). As water is absorbed into the fluid it will gradually reduce it's overall boiling point. For this reason fluids are rated with with two boiling points, one with no water absorbed into the fluid (Dry Boiling Point) and one with 3.5% water absorbed into the fluid (Wet Boiling Point).
    The Wet and Dry boiling points are the MOST important factor when deciding what brake fluid to use, DOT ratings set the minimum requirements for these two boiling points. The higher the DOT rating, the higher the minimum boiling point requirement.
    HOWEVER that is not the whole story as the DOT requirements also stipulate other criteria that the fluids must pass including acidity, corrosion protection etc. but the most important one for us after boiling points is viscosity.
    With the introduction of high tech ABS/TCS/ESP systems there was a need for thinner brake fluids so they could pass easily through the micro valves used in these systems. The main reason why the DOT 5.1 rating was introduced was to set a standard for these thinner fluids.
    DOT 5.1 criteria dictates that the fluid will be thinner in viscosity than a DOT 4 fluid.
    If your manufacturer says you only need a DOT 4 rated brake fluid (as mentioned above, all BMW's only need DOT 4) then you don't need a DOT 5.1 fluid. In fact there aren't many cars that specifically require a DOT 5.1 fluid.

    * If you check the Wet and Dry boiling points of the most popular DOT 4 and 5.1 fluids you will find the best performing fluids (like Castrol SRF) are in fact DOT 4 rated. The reason they are DOT 4 rated is they are too thick to pass the DOT 5.1 viscosity criteria even though they surpass the DOT 5.1 wet and dry boiling point criteria by miles!

    [​IMG]

    * The really important numbers (to me anyway) are the Wet boiling points, SRF wins hands down with this and you can see why it is so widely regraded as the ultimate brake fluid. What the wet boiling points don't tell you however is how quickly the brake fluids can absorb moisture, some fluids are more hygroscopic than others and will get to the wet boiling point quicker than others. Manufacturers can get around this by treating the fluid with Boric acid to help neutralize any water entering the fluid and makes the fluid slower to drop to the wet boiling point. Castrol use this method with their 'Super Dot 4' giving it a longer life. ATE 'Super Blue' is also a very good performer over a long period and I believe was the OEM fluid for BMW's for a while (I have used it in the past and it's been excellent).
    Whatever fluid you chose change it AT LEAST every two years and preferably annually.

    * SRF is expensive and the next alternative is Motul RBF 600 at half the price its worth considering when SRF is approx. £40/Ltr. especially if you do change every year its add's to the already high running costs we all experience...!

    * A few general tips about brake fluid...

    Only buy enough fluid for what you need at the time. Fluid sitting on shelves just absorbs moisture from the atmosphere so when you come to use it, it maybe no good. Incidentally that is why decent fluids come in metal cans (ATE for example and SRF used too), moisture cannot pass through metal where as it can permeate through plastic.

    Speaking of moisture permeating through plastic, tests have proven that the most moisture entering a brake system comes from...moisture permeating directly through the rubber of the brake hoses! Remember that the next time you drive through a puddle

    The Importance of Braided Brake Lines

    * Installing stainless steel braided brake lines should be one of the first purchases for ANY sportscar. Replacing the crappy OEM rubber brake lines has two major benefits: eliminating brake fade and reducing your maintenance. This will help to reduce water permeating through the rubber only hoses, braided are still rubber in the centre so there is still the possibility water getting in but its deffinitely reduced with braided lines but not eliminated.. there are plenty of cheap Halfords sheit out there so make sure you spend a few bux and get DOT approved ones!

    Safety first: Eliminating dangerous brake fade


    * Brake fade is the loss of braking power when your brake system overheats. When you apply your brakes, brake fluid is forced through the rubber brake hoses, squeezing your brake calipers and causing you to decelerate. A by-product of the braking action is HEAT which is bad for your brake lines. As the brake fluids heats up, so do your OEM rubber lines. Hot rubber lines will expand when the brakes are applied - instead of channeling the fluid towards your calipers, they expand outwards, robbing you of valuable braking power.
    * Stainless steel braided brake lines don't expand when heated by your brake fluid. You will get maximum braking power regardless of the time spent riding. These brake lines may save your life one day.

    No Maintainence & Peace of Mind

    * Some manufacturers recommend their OEM rubber brake lines to be changed every couple years. Most stainless steel brake lines never need to be replaced - Most cases one purchase and guaranteed for life!

    Thanx Mroad For some of the Info!

    Topic link here: Brake fluid Upgrade! & Braided Brake lines!

    SUSPENSION

    Rear springs are a common failing on our cars and this is why so many owners choose to replace with aftermarket versions. Most owners will tell you that coilovers are the best way to go. This is very true and like the bbk's a multitude of coilover kits are available for our cars from respective manufacturers starting from around £800.

    Not everybody is in a position to afford or even justify coilovers and therefore lowering spring kits are very popular within the community. By far the most popular after market kit would be the eibach prokit as it is proven to cause the lease amount of wear to the standard shock absorbers and other suspension components. Also at around £140 you cannot really go wrong.
     
  6. 22 Mar 2010 at 3:26 PM #6
    Rutkowski

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    wow very comprehensive.. thanx for that Bruno!!
     
  7. 22 Mar 2010 at 3:28 PM #7
    BRUNBERG

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    Very welcome mate its what forums should be about. Wonder how long it will be before i get negative rep and a sarky comment from someone without the balls to leave their name on this thread:rolleyes:
     
  8. 22 Mar 2010 at 3:46 PM #8
    crag

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    Cheers for info,
     
  9. 22 Mar 2010 at 8:55 PM #9
    Stoo

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    Nice one! Thanks.
     
  10. 23 Mar 2010 at 10:15 PM #10
    cantfind1

    cantfind1 Banned

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  11. 30 Mar 2010 at 10:08 PM #11
    Terminator

    Terminator On the path

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    Sorry posted in wrong thread
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2010
  12. 30 Mar 2010 at 10:12 PM #12
    BRUNBERG

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    It does contradict but my post is based on users impressions of sizes they have tried, therefore may not be as accurate as a computrt generated programme.

    Most members use the sizes in my earlier post i think, i personally run csl sizes and am very happy, just enough tyre wall for hard conering:thumbsup:
     
  13. 30 Mar 2010 at 11:29 PM #13
    Terminator

    Terminator On the path

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    Sorry wrong thread
     
  14. 31 Mar 2010 at 12:26 AM #14
    chattan

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    Again! You seem to be a bit confused..lol...
     
  15. 15 Dec 2013 at 9:30 AM #15
    Dave11

    Dave11 A mere Chipper

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    CSL rims tyre query

    Hi, picking up on an old thread but I'm looking for some advice on CSL 19 inch tyre sizes. Just bought a 2003 with CSL 19s and they are 8.5/9.5J front/rear as stamped around the wheel nuts (pretty sure they are genuine OEM). Current tyres on the car are 225/40 and 255/35 front and rear and I have receipts showing the car has been running these sizes for at least a few years.

    Fronts need replacing so I've just taken delivery of 2 replacement 225/40s , but all the advice seems to be that I should be running 235/35 and 265/30 on these size rims. However I've also read that Michelin pilots only came in 225/40 and 255/35 so a lot of people ran those when the CSL came out (in which case maybe I'm ok with what I've got).

    So before I get the new fronts fitted I am thinking about returning them and ordering 2 x 235/35 instead, but I'll still be running 255/35 on the rear (lots of tread left) until they need replacing.

    Anyone see any problems with set up or balance by doing this or should I just stick with the 225/40s I've just bought. Is it just about personal preference and the wider tyres providing kerb protection or have I got the wrong tyres on the car? Any advice on this brain teaser very welcome! :rolleyes::confused:



     
  16. 5 Mar 2014 at 2:48 PM #16
    Billygilly

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    Sorry to drag up old but does anyone is should there be a problem running a vert with eibach pros on cricmcm's CSL with 265s as I know his alloys run a different ET??
     
  17. 14 Aug 2014 at 4:31 PM #17
    Pandaman

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    Picked up a set of OEM 18" to run in the winter.

    On the 9j rears, anyone know if I can run 245/40/18 tyres?
     
  18. 6 Aug 2015 at 5:49 PM #18
    Malteser

    Malteser On the path

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    Great info!

    Regarding tyres for m3 CS on csl wheels, I'm about to get 235/35/19 & 265/30/19. Can anyone confirm the correct load rating etc, Most tyres in these sizes are 91Y (front) and 93Y (rear). My current tyres have a higher load rating and I seem to remember people saying they should be 93 & 96.

    Does anyone know the correct specifications please. :thumbsup:
     
  19. 2 Oct 2015 at 4:36 PM #19
    Spiked

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    Thanks for this great info much appreciate the time fellow Cutters put into helping others.

    I went for 235/35/19 & 265/30/19 based on this with Michelin Super Sports.
     
  20. 2 Oct 2015 at 6:18 PM #20
    Jaaydee

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    Not seen this topic before, brilliant amount of really useful information, many thanks to the OP for such a well written and detailed thread :thumbsup:
     

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