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Old 20th December 2017, 11:45 PM   #1
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Default E92 m3 rod bearings

Out of piece of mind I’m looking into getting the rod bearings replaced in the new year at some point. How much should this job roughly cost and any good places in Kent that anyone can recommend? Also are there uprated bearings or anything I should be getting fitted and would I need to supply them myself? Any info would be helpful.
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Old 21st December 2017, 08:36 AM   #2
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If you're going for a direct swap of standard bearings, you'll be looking at about £1100.
If you go for coated or oversized bearings, you're looking at £1400 / £1500.

If you're willing to travel to Kings Lynn, Aaron Reeve Performance do bearing swaps incredibly often. I went to them from Liverpool.
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Old 21st December 2017, 11:36 AM   #3
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If I was to have them changed for the standard bearings wouldn’t the same problem still be there with the apparent design fault of the original bearings? If I get them done I want to make sure they will be good for a long time to come ideally.
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Old 21st December 2017, 11:42 AM   #4
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ETA have done a fair few E92 S65's now, based at Brands Htach
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Old 21st December 2017, 11:53 AM   #5
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Quite a few of my friends have used eta for a lot of things and always had a good word to say. I might give them a call and see what they say.
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Old 21st December 2017, 12:52 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirbster View Post
If I was to have them changed for the standard bearings wouldn’t the same problem still be there with the apparent design fault of the original bearings? If I get them done I want to make sure they will be good for a long time to come ideally.
I’d only use oem bearings. Nothing wrong with them at all. Just treat the engine with respect and they’ll last for many years.
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Old 21st December 2017, 12:55 PM   #7
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It's amazing how these rumours develop. Now there's 'an apparent design fault' with them...

Like Ian says there's nothing wrong with the bearings, if you treat your car with a bit of mechanical sympathy or common sense. Which unfortunately the average first owner of these cars clearly haven't got.
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Old 21st December 2017, 01:06 PM   #8
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I’m always really fussy with any of my cars when it comes to letting them warm up properly and regular oil changes etc so when I get them done the car will be well looked after in my ownership.
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Old 21st December 2017, 02:19 PM   #9
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What would be great is if you could politely ask ETA (assuming you use them) to give you the old big-end shells so that you can photograph them and post pictures.

There's lots of these photos from US users but it would be great to see what used UK ones like like, evidence of wear etc.
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Old 21st December 2017, 02:22 PM   #10
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Whoever I get to do the job I’ll ask them for the old ones so I can see what wear there is. The cars only done 60 odd thousand miles so still pretty low mileage really. I only want to do it for piece of mind.
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Old 21st December 2017, 07:01 PM   #11
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I’m in Surrey and drove to Aaron to get mine done.

Was £1500 for uprated bearings,oil and labour.

I went uprated as I want to supercharge and don’t see the point in putting oem’s in where we have an option for better quality bearings


Lee
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Old 21st December 2017, 07:16 PM   #12
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I’m in Surrey and drove to Aaron to get mine done.

Was £1500 for uprated bearings,oil and labour.

I went uprated as I want to supercharge and don’t see the point in putting oem’s in where we have an option for better quality bearings


Lee
What makes them better than genuine Bmw bearings?
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Old 21st December 2017, 09:39 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by alpina527 View Post
What makes them better than genuine Bmw bearings?
I had the ESS spec bearings fitted when I had mine charged at AReeve too, according to their website a special coating makes them more resistant to heat and wear...


http://esstuning.com/s65-high-performance-rod-bearings/


edit: Can also recommend Aaron Reeve for work, about a 200 mile round trip for me, did the trip three times for the charger and wouldn't regret doing it again.
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Old 21st December 2017, 09:49 PM   #14
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I’d love to supercharge mine in the future if funds allow but that won’t be for a long time yet. I’ll probably go for the uprated bearings if that’s the case just so I’ve got that covered if I do decide to get it supercharged further down the line.
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Old 21st December 2017, 10:18 PM   #15
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Virtually every single set of original bearings removed from the s65 (and s85) engine shows abnormal wear - either in greater or lesser amounts. That includes my own bearings which were removed at 32,000 miles and replaced with larger clearance BE Bearings while I had my supercharger fitted.

I have owned my car from new, have always warmed-up extremely gently and have changed my oil at intervals of 7,500m or less, yet all my bearings showed contact marks.

Bearings removed from most ‘normal’ engines even at 100,000m should show virtually no contact wear as they are supposed to ‘float’ on a thin film of oil and prevent metal-to-metal contact between the bearing and crankshaft.

My own theory is that the s65 and s85 engines are virtually race engines with their stratospheric 8,400rpm redlines. In order for the engine to be properly protected when being thrashed round a track at full revs BMW have specified an extremely thick 10w-60 oil but the downside of being able to maintain sufficient lubrication at very high revs means that at start-up the oil is simply too thick to squeeze between the bearings and provide protection before the oil gets hot and thins down. I am not claiming to be an expert in any way, but this is the opinion I have reached after carrying out as much research as I was able. If one pours a little 10w-60 oil into a container and then repeats the exercise with a more mainstream oil - say 0w-40 - the difference in thickness is very clear.

BMW are not concerned at all about this issue as the relatively few cars that do blow up are almost all past the warranty period. The engines that do actually fail are most likely put together with bearings that are even tighter than the already very tight standard clearances as the bearings (as with all engine parts) are specified to be within certain tolerances - they are not all identical to the micron. Only actual racing engines have blue-printed parts which are meticulously measured and weighed to be absolutely on-spec and this is too expensive for production engines.

I have no idea if I am right but I put my money where my mouth is and had Reeve fit the larger-clearance BE bearings a few thousand miles ago. I am running an ESS VT-2 625 supercharger and feel confident I have done the best thing for my engine.

Jack

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Old 22nd December 2017, 06:35 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alpina527 View Post
What makes them better than genuine Bmw bearings?
As said above,if you supercharge they strongly recommend you change them for these uprated bearings.if they wasn’t any better you could leave/replace with oem and supercharge with out worry.mine got changed at 32k car has had max 8k oil changes and what looks like an easy life and mine had wear.

I plan to supercharge so I need them anyway.even if I was staying n/a i’d Put the best I could get in anyway.

I like to rev mine out and enjoy that fantastic motor and with oem’s I’d never trust it.

Lee
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Old 22nd December 2017, 06:38 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FazerBoy View Post
Virtually every single set of original bearings removed from the s65 (and s85) engine shows abnormal wear - either in greater or lesser amounts. That includes my own bearings which were removed at 32,000 miles and replaced with larger clearance BE Bearings while I had my supercharger fitted.

I have owned my car from new, have always warmed-up extremely gently and have changed my oil at intervals of 7,500m or less, yet all my bearings showed contact marks.

Bearings removed from most ‘normal’ engines even at 100,000m should show virtually no contact wear as they are supposed to ‘float’ on a thin film of oil and prevent metal-to-metal contact between the bearing and crankshaft.

My own theory is that the s65 and s85 engines are virtually race engines with their stratospheric 8,400rpm redlines. In order for the engine to be properly protected when being thrashed round a track at full revs BMW have specified an extremely thick 10w-60 oil but the downside of being able to maintain sufficient lubrication at very high revs means that at start-up the oil is simply too thick to squeeze between the bearings and provide protection before the oil gets hot and thins down. I am not claiming to be an expert in any way, but this is the opinion I have reached after carrying out as much research as I was able. If one pours a little 10w-60 oil into a container and then repeats the exercise with a more mainstream oil - say 0w-40 - the difference in thickness is very clear.

BMW are not concerned at all about this issue as the relatively few cars that do blow up are almost all past the warranty period. The engines that do actually fail are most likely put together with bearings that are even tighter than the already very tight standard clearances as the bearings (as with all engine parts) are specified to be within certain tolerances - they are not all identical to the micron. Only actual racing engines have blue-printed parts which are meticulously measured and weighed to be absolutely on-spec and this is too expensive for production engines.

I have no idea if I am right but I put my money where my mouth is and had Reeve fit the larger-clearance BE bearings a few thousand miles ago. I am running an ESS VT-2 625 supercharger and feel confident I have done the best thing for my engine.

Jack


You have done the right thing mate,my best mate has a 625 kit and he has done 20k on his charger kit/new bearings and he properly uses it.he ain’t shy and he cars been perfect.its Done mid 70k now and still strong as ever so well worth spending the extra for bearings imo.


I’m very much for preventative maintenance if the outcome is a total rebuild should it go.
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Old 22nd December 2017, 08:56 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m3dxw View Post
I had the ESS spec bearings fitted when I had mine charged at AReeve too, according to their website a special coating makes them more resistant to heat and wear...


http://esstuning.com/s65-high-performance-rod-bearings/


edit: Can also recommend Aaron Reeve for work, about a 200 mile round trip for me, did the trip three times for the charger and wouldn't regret doing it again.

Interesting, did you have these recommended? I had mine changed recently and went with Genuine BMW bearings but with this treatment, https://store.langracing.com/wpc-sur...mw-e9x-m3-s65/

The reason is that, from what I understand, the extra layer of coating (no matter how thin) will decrease clearance. With the WPC treatment you actually increase the clearance slightly.

The BMW begins on sale now are made from a harder material than the old ones, which is counter intuitively not good, but it was the only way to go with the WPC treatment (due to suppliers)

My original bearings came out at 58K. One of the them showed wear but not too serious.

I can recommend Reddish (Bristol) lots of measurments and pictures provided
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Old 22nd December 2017, 02:21 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FazerBoy View Post
Virtually every single set of original bearings removed from the s65 (and s85) engine shows abnormal wear - either in greater or lesser amounts. That includes my own bearings which were removed at 32,000 miles and replaced with larger clearance BE Bearings while I had my supercharger fitted.

I have owned my car from new, have always warmed-up extremely gently and have changed my oil at intervals of 7,500m or less, yet all my bearings showed contact marks.

Bearings removed from most ‘normal’ engines even at 100,000m should show virtually no contact wear as they are supposed to ‘float’ on a thin film of oil and prevent metal-to-metal contact between the bearing and crankshaft.

My own theory is that the s65 and s85 engines are virtually race engines with their stratospheric 8,400rpm redlines. In order for the engine to be properly protected when being thrashed round a track at full revs BMW have specified an extremely thick 10w-60 oil but the downside of being able to maintain sufficient lubrication at very high revs means that at start-up the oil is simply too thick to squeeze between the bearings and provide protection before the oil gets hot and thins down. I am not claiming to be an expert in any way, but this is the opinion I have reached after carrying out as much research as I was able. If one pours a little 10w-60 oil into a container and then repeats the exercise with a more mainstream oil - say 0w-40 - the difference in thickness is very clear.

BMW are not concerned at all about this issue as the relatively few cars that do blow up are almost all past the warranty period. The engines that do actually fail are most likely put together with bearings that are even tighter than the already very tight standard clearances as the bearings (as with all engine parts) are specified to be within certain tolerances - they are not all identical to the micron. Only actual racing engines have blue-printed parts which are meticulously measured and weighed to be absolutely on-spec and this is too expensive for production engines.

I have no idea if I am right but I put my money where my mouth is and had Reeve fit the larger-clearance BE bearings a few thousand miles ago. I am running an ESS VT-2 625 supercharger and feel confident I have done the best thing for my engine.

Jack
I agree with this basic theory. Hence although I am OCD with warm up and oil change (5k) I still plan to change RB should I keep the car (had it for 4 years and probably keep it as its wonderful). Still haven't made me change oil weight though. What about you Fazer, did you go lighter since the swap?
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Old 22nd December 2017, 03:30 PM   #20
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I agree with this basic theory. Hence although I am OCD with warm up and oil change (5k) I still plan to change RB should I keep the car (had it for 4 years and probably keep it as its wonderful). Still haven't made me change oil weight though. What about you Fazer, did you go lighter since the swap?
No, I’m using 10w-60.

The whole point behind using larger-clearance bearings is to accommodate the thick oil. If you maintain standard bearing clearance then perhaps it’s worth looking at using a lighter weight oil but then of course you will not have the same protection at very high revs and temperatures.
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